My Celebrity Life

Greta Thunberg finds climate change marches ‘very hard’ with Asperger’s: ‘I don’t look forward to them’

The new documentary follows the activist’s journey (Picture: Getty Images)

Greta Thunberg has revealed that she finds taking part in climate change marches ‘very hard’ due to living with Asperger’s syndrome.

The climate change activist discusses her experiences in the new documentary series Greta Thunberg: A Year To Change The World, which arrives on the BBC later this month.

Speaking about her struggles, Greta said: ‘Marches are my thing, that’s what I do. But it’s actually very hard for me, I don’t look forward to them.’

The 18-year-old added: ‘I have Asperger’s and I don’t like everyone surrounding me. Before I started school strikes, I couldn’t move around inside schools because that was too much stimulation and so I had to go to a special school where there were like 5 people in my class.

‘To go from there to this reality it’s just a big contrast. There are people everywhere and everybody’s screaming and it’s quite exhausting. But it is my moral duty as a human being to do everything I can so I don’t know, I just have to do it.’

The upcoming three-part series A Year To Change the World follows Greta on her journey to raise awareness of climate change and the fight to reduce carbon emissions across the world.

The activist spoke about her struggles with marches (Picture: EPA)

Greta visits European coal mines and explores Canada’s oil industry in the series, which began filming in 2016 when then-16-year-old Greta took a year off school to begin her extensive campaign.

After the pandemic forced an end to international travel in 2020, the series continued to film Greta after she returned home to Sweden.

Speaking in the series, Greta added: ‘Now it might seem it’s only negative, but I get lots of energy from it as well. On stage it’s ok because then I can go into another character. Of course it is very inspiring to see that so many people actually care to think about this.

‘Today it feels like we’ve pushed as much as we can. People in power need to treat the crisis like a crisis. Doesn’t mean we won’t continue.’

Greta has spoken about her Asperger’s before, previously silencing critics by telling fans that being different is a ‘superpower’ in an inspirational Instagram post.

Meanwhile, comedian Lee Hurst has said he ‘doesn’t regret’ posting a vile joke about activist Greta online that later saw him suspended from Twitter.

Greta Thunberg: A Year To Change The World is set to arrive on BBC One on Monday, April 12 at 9pm.


Credit: Original article published here.

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