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We Are Lady Parts review: A Muslim punk band’s exploration through self-expression and sisterhood is girl power at its finest

The show is about an all-women Muslim punk band (Picture: Channel 4)

We Are Lady Parts is Channel 4’s newest comedy about an all-women Muslim punk band, smashing a variety of racial stereotypes whilst being both entertaining and hilarious.

The brainchild of the writer-director Nida Manzoor, the six-part series follows the trials and tribulations of a band in desperate need of a lead guitarist as they seek success.

This leads the group to Amina, a PhD student and part-time musician, played by Anjana Vasan, who is as lovable as she is comical and subsequently Lady Parts, punk’s new all-female Muslim band, is complete.

But this is about so much more than a band, it’s a tool to explore female self-expression and sisterhood, steering clear of stereotypical narratives of Muslim women as oppressed victims – they are multifaceted human beings with their own agency.

Nida’s ability to write well-thought-out characters is a strong reminder of the diversity present in Muslim communities, often ignored by mainstream media.

Lady Parts is vital break down of racial stereotypes while allowing for people in the community to feel heard and understood.

There are impeccable performances by all (Picture: Channel 4)

From the get-go it’s clear Lady Parts are a force to be reckoned with, ‘concocting a confused mix of hash anthems and sour girl power; one part boredom, two parts identity crisis.’

Featuring an exciting cast of emerging British talent, the show contains a variety of electric performances.

Sarah Impey plays Saira, a grungy butcher and singer; Juliette Motamed stars as Ayesha, a moody drummer who also works as an Uber driver; Lucie Shorthouse plays Momtaz, who works in a lingerie shop; and Faith Omole as Bisma, a bassist who sells feminist graphic novels on the side.

Amina is a PhD student and sometime musician brought to life by Anjana Vasan (Channel: 4)

Saira is the ring leader of the band, determined to have Amina join (Channel 4)

It’s an exuberant music comedy that sees Nida drawing on her own experiences and taking inspiration from the cultural artists that reside in London. It is unapologetically bold and a joyful celebration of the richness and diversity found in this city.

It is also an exploration of the fundamental questions we all ask ourselves at one point or other: ‘Who am I?’ and ‘Where do I belong?’

An example of great British television, Nida perfectly combines wit, humour and an incredible soundtrack that is immediately compelling.

Not only does We Are Lady Parts boast a rich script and fleshed-out characters, but it also has incredibly stylistic cinematography. This wouldn’t be complete without slapstick dream sequences, bizarre puppet outtakes and playful songs performed by the cast peppered throughout.

The amusing voice-overs, dramatic entrances and comical cuts are reminiscent of the film Scott Pilgrim vs The World which, needless to say, is a massive compliment.

Nida drew on her own experiences for the show (Channel 4)

Watch a show about funny women with real agency, forging their own lives and identities in a world that is hell-bent on doing it for them is more refreshing than perhaps it should be.

We Are Lady Parts blends wonderfully silly, rapid-fire humour with deeper themes of trying to find your place in the world.

During a time when people are crying out for new voices to be heard, We Are Lady parts is sure to make a splash.

We Are Lady Parts lands on Channel 4 on 20 May at 10pm.


Credit: Original article published here.

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