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‘I don’t regret anything, I wish I’d gone ten times harder’: Hunter Moore really has no remorse as he slams ‘misconceptions’ about IsAnyoneUp.com

Hunter Moore wishes he’d ‘gone harder’ (Picture: Netflix)

Hunter Moore, also known as The Most Hated Man on the Internet, really has no remorse, and has claimed his ‘only regret’ was that he ‘didn’t go ten times harder’.

After following how Moore and his website IsAnyoneUp.com were taken down, in Netflix’s newest true crime series, viewers have been slamming ‘the king of revenge porn’.

The 36-year-old founded IsAnyoneUp.com, a controversial ‘revenge porn’ website which let users submit photos and videos, that were mainly nudes or sexually explicit pictures.

From allegedly underage girls to members of bands, hundreds of people were violated as their images were shared online, and along with the images were links to the social media accounts of those photographed.

Moore previously shared that he was actually ‘proud’ of his creation, and in a new interview, has further stated that he has no remorse, despite paying time behind bars.

Hunter Moore shared his lack of regret over his actions (Picture: Netflix)

Answering questions from viewers, Moore replied to Youtuber Daniel Wise asking if he had ‘any remorse’: ‘If there were any regrets, it’s that I didn’t go ten times harder, that’s probably my only regret.

‘If I’m being completely honest, I’m not here to cry a river, I’ve done my time, obviously these people were affected by the site and I feel bad for them, and they obviously need to air their grievances, but at the end of the day I did my time.’

He added: ‘I had a great time, I don’t regret anything, I wish I’d gone ten times harder because the outcome would have been the same.’

Later on in the interview, Moore, now 36, claimed he had ‘changed’, continuing: ‘Do I regret everything? No. But I obviously regret a lot, and wish I would have handled it different. Do I wish I had never started the site? Of course I don’t regret it because it was awesome, but I made some decisions that ultimately were definitely not worth it.

‘I was drunk on this internet fame, and I was not prepared for that. I had horrible direction, and had nobody to help me out.’

He added: ‘I gained this God complex,’ continuing that ‘every single aspect of [his] life went out of control.’

Elsewhere during the interview, Moore slammed ‘misconceptions’ about him and his site that were exposed during the docuseries.

One of them included ‘Butthole girl’ who viewers may know as one of the interviewees during the docuseries, one of IsAnyoneUp.com’s victims.

As shown from old clips in the docuseries, ‘Butthole girl’ earned her name and reputation by inserting household objects into her ‘butthole’, often while on camera, and in one particular clip, while on a recorded video call with Moore.

‘Butthole girl’ (real name Destiny Benedict) tells her side of the story in the Netflix series (Picture: Netflix)

In the docuseries, ‘Butthole girl’, whose real name is Destiny Benedict, claimed Moore’s site actually showed pictures of her children above some of those videos, along with her social media handles.

However, Moore has slammed this as a ‘blatant lie’, claiming that she was ‘lying’ about her children being featured on the site. ‘Everything she said was a blatant lie,’ Moore said during the interview.

Elsewhere, Moore claimed he was never ‘hacked’ by Anonymous, despite clips during the docuseries showing that the hacker group gained access to his bank account and aided in taking him down, even declaring him dead, and sending sex toys to his home address.

A clip showed an Anonymous speaker saying: ‘We will protect anyone who is victimised by abuse of our internet, we will prevent the stalking, rape, and possible murders as by-product of his sites… Operation anti-bully. Operation hunt Hunter engaged. We are Anonymous, we are legion, we do not forgive, we do not forget, Hunter Moore, expect us.’

Eventually Moore sold the site’s domain name to anti-bullying group Bullyville.com, served two years prison time, and was freed under supervised release and ordered to pay a fine following his 2015 trial. He had been federally charged for aggravated identity theft and hacking, having hacked into his victims’ social media accounts to access their photos and then publish them on his site.

Moore’s side of the story was never shown during the series, as it followed his takedown by his victims, and one of his victims’ mothers, Charlotte Laws.

At the lead of the fight against Moore, was Charlotte Laws whose daughter Kayla (R) had her nudes posted on IsAnyoneUp.com after her accounts were hacked (Picture: Netflix)

However, Moore was originally going to be a part of the series. Producers revealed: ‘When we were developing it, he initially agreed to take part, but then decided not to.’

Speaking about his choice, Moore said: ‘Initially I was working with them, and everything was going good, but as they started requesting more details, I started just realising where it was going and what the narrative was that they were going to push.’

‘They desperately wanted to keep me on,’ he added, claiming that Netflix were ‘going out of their way’ to let him view the trailer beforehand.

Moore continued: ‘I had already moved past that, so I didn’t want to relive it. My life has moved on, everything’s going great for me, and this was three years ago when I was initially talking to them, and I just didn’t see any reason to do it. What is it going to do for me?’

The Most Hated Man on the Internet is available to watch on Netflix.

 


Credit: Source

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